Chemoreceptor Sensitivity ‘in Women Mountaineering Trainees of Different Altitudes Inducted by Trekking to 4350 m

  • G. Bhaumik Defence Institute of Physiology & Allied Sciences, Delhi
  • S.S. Purkayastha Defence Institute of Physiology & Allied Sciences, Delhi
  • R.P. Sharma Defence Institute of Physiology & Allied Sciences, Delhi
  • Y.K. Sharma Defence Institute of Physiology & Allied Sciences, Delhi
  • W. Selvamurthy Defence Institute of Physiology & Allied Sciences, Delhi
  • P.K. Banerjee Defence Institute of Physiology & Allied Sciences, Delhi
Keywords: Hypoxic ventilatory response, hypercapnic ventilatory response, high altitude, chemoreceptor sensitivity

Abstract

This study was conducted on women mountaineering trainees to evaluate the hypoxic and hypercapnic ventilatory responses, and the precise nature of changes in the sensitivity of chemoreceptors on induction by trekking to 4350 m. Two groups of women belonging to different ethnic origins and residents of different altitudes, ie, moderate-altitude women (MAWMongolians) and low-altitude women (LAW-Caucasians) were the subjects in this study. Tests of sensitivity to hypoxia and hypercapnia were carried out initially at 2100 m, then during 4 to7 days of sojourn at 4350 m following induction by trekking, and re-tested on return to 2 100 m. The results indicate that there is a significant difference (P c 0.05) of hypoxic ventilatory response in women of two different ethnic groups: Both hypoxic and hypercapnic ventilatory responses increased significantly (P < 0.05) on induction to high altitude. On descent, hypoxic values reverted back to pre-induction levels, whereas hypercapnic ventilatory response showed relatively higher values (P < 0.05).
Published
2005-10-01
How to Cite
BhaumikG., PurkayasthaS., SharmaR., SharmaY., SelvamurthyW., & BanerjeeP. (2005). Chemoreceptor Sensitivity ‘in Women Mountaineering Trainees of Different Altitudes Inducted by Trekking to 4350 m. Defence Science Journal, 55(4), 427-435. https://doi.org/10.14429/dsj.55.2004
Section
Biomedical Sciences